BEHIND THE FASHION DOCUMENTARY: ‘DIOR AND I’

Estefania Garcia-Correa
Estefania Garcia-Correa

On Tuesday April 7, the New York premiere of The Orchard’s “Dior & I” was held at Paris Theater. The film seduces the viewer into a magical parallel reality between the present (2012) and the black and white past when Christian Dior was still alive.

The film explores the intimate process of the first haute couture collection by Raf Simons when he first joined the French house. The story doesn’t follow the usual structure of a documentary. The cinematography and narration, gives it a fantastical aura in which viewers can submerge themselves in.

Frederic Tcheng, the director, succeeds in delivering totally unique films, even though they are all surrounding legendary characters of the fashion industry. In this one in particular, we got to know the seamstresses and staff of the couture department of Christian Dior. It is a very Parisian environment, with effortlessly chic women who represent the true Dior legacy.

Besides understanding the hierarchy of Dior and it’s most valuable workers, we got a chance to dissect Raf Simons’ creative process. It was captivating to see how art, Dior himself, and everything around him influenced his process. When he cried the entire audience cried. When he got the approval from monsieur Arnault to build a set that would look “like puppy in Versailles,” said Simmons referring to the famous Jeff Koons flower puppy at the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, the entire audience sighed in relief and emotion.

This is a film way beyond information and displaying the insights of a luxurious entity to the hoi polloi. Dior and I is about emotion; regardless of whether we can understand the peculiar state of stressful anxiety that is seen in the fashion industry, we can understand the feeling of accomplishing a goal so lavish and intricate that seems like a dream.

Later on, guests joined the after party at the Metropolitan Club where hor d’œuvres, macarons and champagne was served while everyone commented the grandiosity of the film.  

This article originally appeared on Jones Magazine